SCB2019_artists_Emilija_Skarnulyte

Deep Point Cloud (2019) is a visual meditation and examination of the contemporary science conditions related to deep sea mining and ocean mapping.

While everyone else is pointing towards the future, Deep Point Cloud is set 10,000 years from now but looking back from the future into the past, to uncover our present moment. The underwater Ocean Basin is examined from an ‘alien archeology perspective’ to reconstruct the mythologies and beliefs of the past. As humans will be already extinct, the landscape will be only occupied by the leftovers of the human production, populated by the ruins of impressive architectures such as oil rigs and mines. These ruins will stand as evidence as Deep Point Cloud’s mythologizes our present moment.

Deep Point Cloud is not based on verbal narration or conventional documentary language. Instead, it articulates the content through light effects, sound, absence, and movements by using an evocative approach. The film is shot in different places in the Arctic Basin, using different 3D laser scanner data and a Deep Vision camera. Combining research material, landscape shots and archival footage, with this work Škarnulytė aims at reflecting on the changing image of the North, as a site where violence, desire, greed, and emotions are played out.

Deep Point Cloud has been commissioned by Screen City Biennial and will be premiered during the upcoming edition Ecologies - lost, found and continued.

BIOGRAPHY

Emilija Škarnulytė is a nomadic visual artist and filmmaker. Between the fictive and documentary, she works primarily with deep time, from the cosmic and geologic to the ecological and political. Recent group exhibitions include Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, Texas; Moving Stones at the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris; and the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art; as well as a new commission for Bold Tendencies in London and a solo show at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Škarnulytė is the winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2019 and represented Lithuania at the XXII Triennale di Milano. Her upcoming shows include the Toronto Biennial of Art, Canada and 95% of the Universe is Missing, Science Gallery, London, UK. She currently co-directs Polar Film Lab, a collective for 16mm analogue film practice located in Tromsø, Norway.

Deep Point Cloud (2019) is a visual meditation and examination of the contemporary science conditions related to deep sea mining and ocean mapping.

While everyone else is pointing towards the future, Deep Point Cloud is set 10,000 years from now but looking back from the future into the past, to uncover our present moment. The underwater Ocean Basin is examined from an ‘alien archeology perspective’ to reconstruct the mythologies and beliefs of the past. As humans will be already extinct, the landscape will be only occupied by the leftovers of the human production, populated by the ruins of impressive architectures such as oil rigs and mines. These ruins will stand as evidence as Deep Point Cloud’s mythologizes our present moment.

Deep Point Cloud is not based on verbal narration or conventional documentary language. Instead, it articulates the content through light effects, sound, absence, and movements by using an evocative approach. The film is shot in different places in the Arctic Basin, using different 3D laser scanner data and a Deep Vision camera. Combining research material, landscape shots and archival footage, with this work Škarnulytė aims at reflecting on the changing image of the North, as a site where violence, desire, greed, and emotions are played out.

Deep Point Cloud has been commissioned by Screen City Biennial and will be premiered during the upcoming edition Ecologies - lost, found and continued.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Emilija Škarnulytė is a nomadic visual artist and filmmaker. Between the fictive and documentary, she works primarily with deep time, from the cosmic and geologic to the ecological and political. Recent group exhibitions include Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, Texas; Moving Stones at the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris; and the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art; as well as a new commission for Bold Tendencies in London and a solo show at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Škarnulytė is the winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2019 and represented Lithuania at the XXII Triennale di Milano. Her upcoming shows include the Toronto Biennial of Art, Canada and 95% of the Universe is Missing, Science Gallery, London, UK. She currently co-directs Polar Film Lab, a collective for 16mm analogue film practice located in Tromsø, Norway.

Deep Point Cloud (2019) is a visual meditation and examination of the contemporary science conditions related to deep sea mining and ocean mapping.

While everyone else is pointing towards the future, Deep Point Cloud is set 10,000 years from now but looking back from the future into the past, to uncover our present moment. The underwater Ocean Basin is examined from an ‘alien archeology perspective’ to reconstruct the mythologies and beliefs of the past. As humans will be already extinct, the landscape will be only occupied by the leftovers of the human production, populated by the ruins of impressive architectures such as oil rigs and mines. These ruins will stand as evidence as Deep Point Cloud’s mythologizes our present moment.

Deep Point Cloud is not based on verbal narration or conventional documentary language. Instead, it articulates the content through light effects, sound, absence, and movements by using an evocative approach. The film is shot in different places in the Arctic Basin, using different 3D laser scanner data and a Deep Vision camera. Combining research material, landscape shots and archival footage, with this work Škarnulytė aims at reflecting on the changing image of the North, as a site where violence, desire, greed, and emotions are played out.

Deep Point Cloud has been commissioned by Screen City Biennial and will be premiered during the upcoming edition Ecologies - lost, found and continued.

BIOGRAPHY

Emilija Škarnulytė is a nomadic visual artist and filmmaker. Between the fictive and documentary, she works primarily with deep time, from the cosmic and geologic to the ecological and political. Recent group exhibitions include Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, Texas; Moving Stones at the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris; and the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art; as well as a new commission for Bold Tendencies in London and a solo show at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Škarnulytė is the winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2019 and represented Lithuania at the XXII Triennale di Milano. Her upcoming shows include the Toronto Biennial of Art, Canada and 95% of the Universe is Missing, Science Gallery, London, UK. She currently co-directs Polar Film Lab, a collective for 16mm analogue film practice located in Tromsø, Norway.

Deep Point Cloud (2019) is a visual meditation and examination of the contemporary science conditions related to deep sea mining and ocean mapping.

While everyone else is pointing towards the future, Deep Point Cloud is set 10,000 years from now but looking back from the future into the past, to uncover our present moment. The underwater Ocean Basin is examined from an ‘alien archeology perspective’ to reconstruct the mythologies and beliefs of the past. As humans will be already extinct, the landscape will be only occupied by the leftovers of the human production, populated by the ruins of impressive architectures such as oil rigs and mines. These ruins will stand as evidence as Deep Point Cloud’s mythologizes our present moment.

Deep Point Cloud is not based on verbal narration or conventional documentary language. Instead, it articulates the content through light effects, sound, absence, and movements by using an evocative approach. The film is shot in different places in the Arctic Basin, using different 3D laser scanner data and a Deep Vision camera. Combining research material, landscape shots and archival footage, with this work Škarnulytė aims at reflecting on the changing image of the North, as a site where violence, desire, greed, and emotions are played out.

Deep Point Cloud has been commissioned by Screen City Biennial and will be premiered during the upcoming edition Ecologies - lost, found and continued.

BIOGRAPHY

Emilija Škarnulytė is a nomadic visual artist and filmmaker. Between the fictive and documentary, she works primarily with deep time, from the cosmic and geologic to the ecological and political. Recent group exhibitions include Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, Texas; Moving Stones at the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris; and the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art; as well as a new commission for Bold Tendencies in London and a solo show at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Škarnulytė is the winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2019 and represented Lithuania at the XXII Triennale di Milano. Her upcoming shows include the Toronto Biennial of Art, Canada and 95% of the Universe is Missing, Science Gallery, London, UK. She currently co-directs Polar Film Lab, a collective for 16mm analogue film practice located in Tromsø, Norway.

Deep Point Cloud (2019) is a visual meditation and examination of the contemporary science conditions related to deep sea mining and ocean mapping.

While everyone else is pointing towards the future, Deep Point Cloud is set 10,000 years from now but looking back from the future into the past, to uncover our present moment. The underwater Ocean Basin is examined from an ‘alien archeology perspective’ to reconstruct the mythologies and beliefs of the past. As humans will be already extinct, the landscape will be only occupied by the leftovers of the human production, populated by the ruins of impressive architectures such as oil rigs and mines. These ruins will stand as evidence as Deep Point Cloud’s mythologizes our present moment.

Deep Point Cloud is not based on verbal narration or conventional documentary language. Instead, it articulates the content through light effects, sound, absence, and movements by using an evocative approach. The film is shot in different places in the Arctic Basin, using different 3D laser scanner data and a Deep Vision camera. Combining research material, landscape shots and archival footage, with this work Škarnulytė aims at reflecting on the changing image of the North, as a site where violence, desire, greed, and emotions are played out.

Deep Point Cloud has been commissioned by Screen City Biennial and will be premiered during the upcoming edition Ecologies - lost, found and continued.

BIOGRAPHY

Emilija Škarnulytė is a nomadic visual artist and filmmaker. Between the fictive and documentary, she works primarily with deep time, from the cosmic and geologic to the ecological and political. Recent group exhibitions include Hyperobjects at Ballroom Marfa, Texas; Moving Stones at the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris; and the first Riga International Biennial of Contemporary Art; as well as a new commission for Bold Tendencies in London and a solo show at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Škarnulytė is the winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2019 and represented Lithuania at the XXII Triennale di Milano. Her upcoming shows include the Toronto Biennial of Art, Canada and 95% of the Universe is Missing, Science Gallery, London, UK. She currently co-directs Polar Film Lab, a collective for 16mm analogue film practice located in Tromsø, Norway.

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