SCB2019_artists_Marjolijn_Dijkman

Reclaiming Vision (2018)
Film (HD), 26:37 min
Stereo sound

Captured through a light microscope, Reclaiming Vision features a diverse cast of microorganisms, sampled from brackish water, alongside algae, cultivated in a lab. The film reveals various processes in the water that are hidden to the naked human eye. By investigating the brackish water, its inhabitants, its properties, and the traces left by human activities, the film is a reflection upon the relationship we humans have with our surroundings, especially through what we cannot see.

The film is inspired by real and historical events. The scenes have been staged by the artists, taking the presumption of reality that characterises nature documentaries into the realm of fiction film. Any resemblance to scientific research is coincidental. Starting from the assertion that looking evolved from the sea – eyes, in fact, evolved from marine algae – Reclaiming Vision takes the viewer on a journey through various ways of looking at, relating to and influencing nature.

The music for the film is a composition for electronics, cello and voice, composed by Henry Vega. At Screen City Biennial 2019, for the first time, Vega will accompany the images of Reclaiming Vision with a live performance of the score, together with cellist Jan Willem Troost.

Directed by Marjolijn Dijkman & Toril Johannessen
Music by Henry Vega
Performed by Jan Willem Troost (cello) and Henry Vega (electronics).

The film has been commissioned by The Munch Museum for Munchmuseet on the Move, 2018. Screen City Biennial 2019 will present the first live performance of the work.

BIOGRAPHY

Toril Johannessen (b.1978, Norway) is an artist living in Tromsø. Perception and representation as historical and technological constructs are recurring themes in Johannessen’s artistic practice. Combining historical records with fiction and her own investigations, and with an attention to how science coexists with other systems of knowledge and belief, her works often has elements of storytelling in visual or written form. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Entrée, Bergen (2019); Munchmuseet on the Move (w/Marjolijn Dijkman), Oslo (2018); Hordaland Art Centre, Bergen (2017); ARoS, Aarhus (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2016), and group shows such as NATURvitenskap, Trondheim Art Museum (2018); the 13th Dak’Art Biennial de Dakar (2018); STAGES, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg (2017), and What Remains - The Golden Records, Fotogalleriet, Oslo (2017).

Marjolijn Dijkman’s practice evolves from a wide spectrum of interests, with works ranging in media with appropriated aspects from culture and science, which are often entangling different temporalities and geographies. Her works can be seen as a form of science fiction; partly based on facts and research but often brought into the realm of fiction, abstraction, and speculation. Dijkman is the co-founder of Enough Room for Space, an interdependent art organization initiating experimental research projects and exhibitions. Dijkman has had solo shows at Munchmuseet, Oslo (with Toril Johannessen, 2018); at the ICA, London (2015); IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011); and Berkeley Art Museum, USA (2010). She has participated in the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018), the 11th Shanghai Biennale (2016), and the 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007).

Reclaiming Vision (2018)
Film (HD), 26:37 min
Stereo sound

Captured through a light microscope, ‘Reclaiming Vision’ features a diverse cast of microorganisms, sampled from brackish water, alongside algae, cultivated in a lab. The film reveals various processes in the water that are hidden to the naked human eye. By investigating the brackish water, its inhabitants, its properties, and the traces left by human activities, the film is a reflection upon the relationship we humans have with our surroundings, especially through what we cannot see. The film is inspired by real and historical events. The scenes have been staged by the artists, taking the presumption of reality that characterises nature documentaries into the realm of fiction film. Any resemblance to scientific research is coincidental. Starting from the assertion that looking evolved from the sea – eyes, in fact, evolved from marine algae – ‘Reclaiming Vision’ takes the viewer on a journey through various ways of looking at, relating to and influencing nature. The music for the film is a composition for electronics, cello and voice, composed by Henry Vega. At Screen City Biennial 2019, for the first time, Vega will accompany the images of Reclaiming Vision with a live performance of the score, together with cellist Jan Willem Troost.

Directed by Marjolijn Dijkman & Toril Johannessen
Music by Henry Vega
Performed by Jan Willem Troost (cello) and Henry Vega (electronics).

The film has been commissioned by The Munch Museum for Munchmuseet on the Move, 2018. Screen City Biennial 2019 will present the first live performance of the work.

BIOGRAPHY

Toril Johannessen (b.1978, Norway) is an artist living in Tromsø. Perception and representation as historical and technological constructs are recurring themes in Johannessen’s artistic practice. Combining historical records with fiction and her own investigations, and with an attention to how science coexists with other systems of knowledge and belief, her works often has elements of storytelling in visual or written form. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Entrée, Bergen (2019); Munchmuseet on the Move (w/Marjolijn Dijkman), Oslo (2018); Hordaland Art Centre, Bergen (2017); ARoS, Aarhus (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2016), and group shows such as NATURvitenskap, Trondheim Art Museum (2018); the 13th Dak’Art Biennial de Dakar (2018); STAGES, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg (2017), and What Remains - The Golden Records, Fotogalleriet, Oslo (2017).

Marjolijn Dijkman’s practice evolves from a wide spectrum of interests, with works ranging in media with appropriated aspects from culture and science, which are often entangling different temporalities and geographies. Her works can be seen as a form of science fiction; partly based on facts and research but often brought into the realm of fiction, abstraction, and speculation. Dijkman is the co-founder of Enough Room for Space, an interdependent art organization initiating experimental research projects and exhibitions. Dijkman has had solo shows at Munchmuseet, Oslo (with Toril Johannessen, 2018); at the ICA, London (2015); IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011); and Berkeley Art Museum, USA (2010). She has participated in the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018), the 11th Shanghai Biennale (2016), and the 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007).

Reclaiming Vision (2018)
Film (HD), 26:37 min
Stereo sound

Captured through a light microscope, ‘Reclaiming Vision’ features a diverse cast of microorganisms, sampled from brackish water, alongside algae, cultivated in a lab. The film reveals various processes in the water that are hidden to the naked human eye. By investigating the brackish water, its inhabitants, its properties, and the traces left by human activities, the film is a reflection upon the relationship we humans have with our surroundings, especially through what we cannot see. The film is inspired by real and historical events. The scenes have been staged by the artists, taking the presumption of reality that characterises nature documentaries into the realm of fiction film. Any resemblance to scientific research is coincidental. Starting from the assertion that looking evolved from the sea – eyes, in fact, evolved from marine algae – ‘Reclaiming Vision’ takes the viewer on a journey through various ways of looking at, relating to and influencing nature. The music for the film is a composition for electronics, cello and voice, composed by Henry Vega. At Screen City Biennial 2019, for the first time, Vega will accompany the images of Reclaiming Vision with a live performance of the score, together with cellist Jan Willem Troost.

Directed by Marjolijn Dijkman & Toril Johannessen
Music by Henry Vega
Performed by Jan Willem Troost (cello) and Henry Vega (electronics).

The film has been commissioned by The Munch Museum for Munchmuseet on the Move, 2018. Screen City Biennial 2019 will present the first live performance of the work.

BIOGRAPHY

Toril Johannessen (b.1978, Norway) is an artist living in Tromsø. Perception and representation as historical and technological constructs are recurring themes in Johannessen’s artistic practice. Combining historical records with fiction and her own investigations, and with an attention to how science coexists with other systems of knowledge and belief, her works often has elements of storytelling in visual or written form. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Entrée, Bergen (2019); Munchmuseet on the Move (w/Marjolijn Dijkman), Oslo (2018); Hordaland Art Centre, Bergen (2017); ARoS, Aarhus (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2016), and group shows such as NATURvitenskap, Trondheim Art Museum (2018); the 13th Dak’Art Biennial de Dakar (2018); STAGES, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg (2017), and What Remains - The Golden Records, Fotogalleriet, Oslo (2017).

Marjolijn Dijkman’s practice evolves from a wide spectrum of interests, with works ranging in media with appropriated aspects from culture and science, which are often entangling different temporalities and geographies. Her works can be seen as a form of science fiction; partly based on facts and research but often brought into the realm of fiction, abstraction, and speculation. Dijkman is the co-founder of Enough Room for Space, an interdependent art organization initiating experimental research projects and exhibitions. Dijkman has had solo shows at Munchmuseet, Oslo (with Toril Johannessen, 2018); at the ICA, London (2015); IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011); and Berkeley Art Museum, USA (2010). She has participated in the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018), the 11th Shanghai Biennale (2016), and the 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007).

Reclaiming Vision (2018)
Film (HD), 26:37 min
Stereo sound

Captured through a light microscope, ‘Reclaiming Vision’ features a diverse cast of microorganisms, sampled from brackish water, alongside algae, cultivated in a lab. The film reveals various processes in the water that are hidden to the naked human eye. By investigating the brackish water, its inhabitants, its properties, and the traces left by human activities, the film is a reflection upon the relationship we humans have with our surroundings, especially through what we cannot see. The film is inspired by real and historical events. The scenes have been staged by the artists, taking the presumption of reality that characterises nature documentaries into the realm of fiction film. Any resemblance to scientific research is coincidental. Starting from the assertion that looking evolved from the sea – eyes, in fact, evolved from marine algae – ‘Reclaiming Vision’ takes the viewer on a journey through various ways of looking at, relating to and influencing nature. The music for the film is a composition for electronics, cello and voice, composed by Henry Vega. At Screen City Biennial 2019, for the first time, Vega will accompany the images of Reclaiming Vision with a live performance of the score, together with cellist Jan Willem Troost.

Directed by Marjolijn Dijkman & Toril Johannessen
Music by Henry Vega
Performed by Jan Willem Troost (cello) and Henry Vega (electronics).

The film has been commissioned by The Munch Museum for Munchmuseet on the Move, 2018. Screen City Biennial 2019 will present the first live performance of the work.

BIOGRAPHY

Toril Johannessen (b.1978, Norway) is an artist living in Tromsø. Perception and representation as historical and technological constructs are recurring themes in Johannessen’s artistic practice. Combining historical records with fiction and her own investigations, and with an attention to how science coexists with other systems of knowledge and belief, her works often has elements of storytelling in visual or written form. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Entrée, Bergen (2019); Munchmuseet on the Move (w/Marjolijn Dijkman), Oslo (2018); Hordaland Art Centre, Bergen (2017); ARoS, Aarhus (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2016), and group shows such as NATURvitenskap, Trondheim Art Museum (2018); the 13th Dak’Art Biennial de Dakar (2018); STAGES, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg (2017), and What Remains - The Golden Records, Fotogalleriet, Oslo (2017).

Marjolijn Dijkman’s practice evolves from a wide spectrum of interests, with works ranging in media with appropriated aspects from culture and science, which are often entangling different temporalities and geographies. Her works can be seen as a form of science fiction; partly based on facts and research but often brought into the realm of fiction, abstraction, and speculation. Dijkman is the co-founder of Enough Room for Space, an interdependent art organization initiating experimental research projects and exhibitions. Dijkman has had solo shows at Munchmuseet, Oslo (with Toril Johannessen, 2018); at the ICA, London (2015); IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011); and Berkeley Art Museum, USA (2010). She has participated in the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018), the 11th Shanghai Biennale (2016), and the 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007).

Reclaiming Vision (2018)
Film (HD), 26:37 min
Stereo sound

Captured through a light microscope, ‘Reclaiming Vision’ features a diverse cast of microorganisms, sampled from brackish water, alongside algae, cultivated in a lab. The film reveals various processes in the water that are hidden to the naked human eye. By investigating the brackish water, its inhabitants, its properties, and the traces left by human activities, the film is a reflection upon the relationship we humans have with our surroundings, especially through what we cannot see. The film is inspired by real and historical events. The scenes have been staged by the artists, taking the presumption of reality that characterises nature documentaries into the realm of fiction film. Any resemblance to scientific research is coincidental. Starting from the assertion that looking evolved from the sea – eyes, in fact, evolved from marine algae – ‘Reclaiming Vision’ takes the viewer on a journey through various ways of looking at, relating to and influencing nature. The music for the film is a composition for electronics, cello and voice, composed by Henry Vega. At Screen City Biennial 2019, for the first time, Vega will accompany the images of Reclaiming Vision with a live performance of the score, together with cellist Jan Willem Troost.

Directed by Marjolijn Dijkman & Toril Johannessen
Music by Henry Vega
Performed by Jan Willem Troost (cello) and Henry Vega (electronics).

The film has been commissioned by The Munch Museum for Munchmuseet on the Move, 2018. Screen City Biennial 2019 will present the first live performance of the work.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Toril Johannessen (b.1978, Norway) is an artist living in Tromsø. Perception and representation as historical and technological constructs are recurring themes in Johannessen’s artistic practice. Combining historical records with fiction and her own investigations, and with an attention to how science coexists with other systems of knowledge and belief, her works often has elements of storytelling in visual or written form. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Entrée, Bergen (2019); Munchmuseet on the Move (w/Marjolijn Dijkman), Oslo (2018); Hordaland Art Centre, Bergen (2017); ARoS, Aarhus (2017); Museum of Contemporary Art, Oslo (2016), and group shows such as NATURvitenskap, Trondheim Art Museum (2018); the 13th Dak’Art Biennial de Dakar (2018); STAGES, Plug In ICA, Winnipeg (2017), and What Remains - The Golden Records, Fotogalleriet, Oslo (2017).

Marjolijn Dijkman’s practice evolves from a wide spectrum of interests, with works ranging in media with appropriated aspects from culture and science, which are often entangling different temporalities and geographies. Her works can be seen as a form of science fiction; partly based on facts and research but often brought into the realm of fiction, abstraction, and speculation. Dijkman is the co-founder of Enough Room for Space, an interdependent art organization initiating experimental research projects and exhibitions. Dijkman has had solo shows at Munchmuseet, Oslo (with Toril Johannessen, 2018); at the ICA, London (2015); IKON Gallery, Birmingham, UK (2011); and Berkeley Art Museum, USA (2010). She has participated in the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018), the 11th Shanghai Biennale (2016), and the 8th Sharjah Biennial (2007).

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