18NOR_SCB_artists_Mikhail_Karikis

No Ordinary Protest

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

No Ordinary Protest

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

No Ordinary Protest

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

No Ordinary Protest

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

No Ordinary Protest

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

No Ordinary Protest (2018)
HD video, sound
7' 48''
Courtesy of the artist

Can sound mobilize socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance Mikhail Karikis adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In the central video of Karikis’ project, a group of 7-year old children gather to debate and they discover a shared sense of justice and responsibility towards the environment, and the urgent need for solidarity with all creatures. The video concludes with the children’s transformation into playful yet monstrous masked agitators confronting the viewer. While being uncertain about our ecological future, Karikis’ No Ordinary Protest uncovers children’s political voice and activist imagination.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

No Ordinary Protest (2018)
HD video, sound
7' 48''
Courtesy of the artist

Can sound mobilize socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance Mikhail Karikis adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In the central video of Karikis’ project, a group of 7-year old children gather to debate and they discover a shared sense of justice and responsibility towards the environment, and the urgent need for solidarity with all creatures. The video concludes with the children’s transformation into playful yet monstrous masked agitators confronting the viewer. While being uncertain about our ecological future, Karikis’ No Ordinary Protest uncovers children’s political voice and activist imagination.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

No Ordinary Protest (2018)
HD video, sound
7' 48''
Courtesy of the artist

Can sound mobilize socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance Mikhail Karikis adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In the central video of Karikis’ project, a group of 7-year old children gather to debate and they discover a shared sense of justice and responsibility towards the environment, and the urgent need for solidarity with all creatures. The video concludes with the children’s transformation into playful yet monstrous masked agitators confronting the viewer. While being uncertain about our ecological future, Karikis’ No Ordinary Protest uncovers children’s political voice and activist imagination.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

No Ordinary Protest (2018)
HD video, sound
7' 48''
Courtesy of the artist

Can sound mobilize socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance Mikhail Karikis adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In the central video of Karikis’ project, a group of 7-year old children gather to debate and they discover a shared sense of justice and responsibility towards the environment, and the urgent need for solidarity with all creatures. The video concludes with the children’s transformation into playful yet monstrous masked agitators confronting the viewer. While being uncertain about our ecological future, Karikis’ No Ordinary Protest uncovers children’s political voice and activist imagination.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

No Ordinary Protest (2018)
HD video, sound
7' 48''
Courtesy of the artist

Can sound mobilize socio-political and physical change? Working across film, sound and performance Mikhail Karikis adopts the children’s science fiction novel ‘The Iron Woman’ (1993) by British writer Ted Hughes as an ecofeminist parable in which communal listening and noise-making become tools to transform the world. In the central video of Karikis’ project, a group of 7-year old children gather to debate and they discover a shared sense of justice and responsibility towards the environment, and the urgent need for solidarity with all creatures. The video concludes with the children’s transformation into playful yet monstrous masked agitators confronting the viewer. While being uncertain about our ecological future, Karikis’ No Ordinary Protest uncovers children’s political voice and activist imagination.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

18NOR_SCB_artists_Mikhail_Karikis_2

Children of Unquiet

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

Children of Unquiet

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

Children of Unquiet

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

Children of Unquiet

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

Children of Unquiet

Mikhail Karikis (GR/UK)

Children of Unquiet (2014)
HD video
15' 38''
Courtesy of the artist

In this work, Mikhail Karikis orchestrates a children’s ‘take over’ of an uninhabited workers’ village in Italy centering on the children’s aural and physical interventions. The work features forty-five children who are growing up around a deserted industrial village, which was abandoned by their parents after the complete automation of the local geothermal power plant where they all worked. The site is in the Devil’s Valley in Tuscany, known for inspiring the hellish descriptions of Dante’s Inferno and for being the place where the first sustainable energy power plant in the world was built. In Karikis’ video, youngsters between five and twelve years old seize the depopulated sites, transforming the vaporous wasteland into a self-organized school and a playground.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

Children of Unquiet (2014)
HD video
15' 38''
Courtesy of the artist

In this work, Mikhail Karikis orchestrates a children’s ‘take over’ of an uninhabited workers’ village in Italy centering on the children’s aural and physical interventions. The work features forty-five children who are growing up around a deserted industrial village, which was abandoned by their parents after the complete automation of the local geothermal power plant where they all worked. The site is in the Devil’s Valley in Tuscany, known for inspiring the hellish descriptions of Dante’s Inferno and for being the place where the first sustainable energy power plant in the world was built. In Karikis’ video, youngsters between five and twelve years old seize the depopulated sites, transforming the vaporous wasteland into a self-organized school and a playground.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

Children of Unquiet (2014)
HD video
15' 38''
Courtesy of the artist

In this work, Mikhail Karikis orchestrates a children’s ‘take over’ of an uninhabited workers’ village in Italy centering on the children’s aural and physical interventions. The work features forty-five children who are growing up around a deserted industrial village, which was abandoned by their parents after the complete automation of the local geothermal power plant where they all worked. The site is in the Devil’s Valley in Tuscany, known for inspiring the hellish descriptions of Dante’s Inferno and for being the place where the first sustainable energy power plant in the world was built. In Karikis’ video, youngsters between five and twelve years old seize the depopulated sites, transforming the vaporous wasteland into a self-organized school and a playground.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

Children of Unquiet (2014)
HD video
15' 38''
Courtesy of the artist

In this work, Mikhail Karikis orchestrates a children’s ‘take over’ of an uninhabited workers’ village in Italy centering on the children’s aural and physical interventions. The work features forty-five children who are growing up around a deserted industrial village, which was abandoned by their parents after the complete automation of the local geothermal power plant where they all worked. The site is in the Devil’s Valley in Tuscany, known for inspiring the hellish descriptions of Dante’s Inferno and for being the place where the first sustainable energy power plant in the world was built. In Karikis’ video, youngsters between five and twelve years old seize the depopulated sites, transforming the vaporous wasteland into a self-organized school and a playground.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

Children of Unquiet (2014)
HD video
15' 38''
Courtesy of the artist

In this work, Mikhail Karikis orchestrates a children’s ‘take over’ of an uninhabited workers’ village in Italy centering on the children’s aural and physical interventions. The work features forty-five children who are growing up around a deserted industrial village, which was abandoned by their parents after the complete automation of the local geothermal power plant where they all worked. The site is in the Devil’s Valley in Tuscany, known for inspiring the hellish descriptions of Dante’s Inferno and for being the place where the first sustainable energy power plant in the world was built. In Karikis’ video, youngsters between five and twelve years old seize the depopulated sites, transforming the vaporous wasteland into a self-organized school and a playground.


BIO

Mikhail Karikis is a Greek/British artist based in London and Lisbon. Employing filmmaking strategies that undermine dominant frames of representation, he collaborates with individuals and communities located outside the context of contemporary art, often pushed into economic and socio-geographic fringes. This results in participatory films that highlight alternative modes of solidarity and imaginative acts of resistance while nurturing dignity and tenderness. Karikis has exhibited in leading biennials including 54th Venice Biennale, IT (2011); Manifesta 9, Ghenk, BE (2012) and 19th Sydney Biennale, AU (2014). Recent solo exhibitions were at Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (2018-2019); MORI Art Museum, Tokyo, JP (2019) and Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain, LU (2017).

The work is part of guest curator Nathanja van Dijk’s screening program Unquiet.

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