OLIVER RESSLER

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart
(2016–ongoing)

OLIVER RESSLER

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart
(2016–ongoing)

ONLINE EXHIBITION
17—30 October 2019

ONLINE EXHIBITION
17—30 October 2019

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Limity Jsme My (2019)

4K video, 10'
Courtesy of the artist


This film leads us directly into the blockade of the Bílina coal mine in Northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. In June 2018, climate activists entered the mine in an attempt to stop all activities there and to insist on the need to shut down climate-destructive mining operations. The blockade followed an action consensus that rejected property damage and sought to avoid direct confrontation with the police. Nonetheless, 280 of approximately 400 activists taking part were detained. The camera follows a group of activists awaiting deportation inside a police kettle, against the backdrop of a landscape defaced by lignite strip-mining. While the screen shows images filmed from inside a prisoner transport vehicle, we hear the voice of a semi-fictional character, reflecting on mass civil disobedience.

The work is part of Ressler’s ongoing project Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart that follows the struggles against a fossil fuel-dependent economy. The film was facilitated by Art for the Climate in the framework of the Czech Climate Camp in 2018, commissioned by S.a.L.E.-Docks, Venice for the exhibition Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart and received support from the Land Steiermark.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Limity Jsme My (2019)

4K video, 10'
Courtesy of the artist


This film leads us directly into the blockade of the Bílina coal mine in Northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. In June 2018, climate activists entered the mine in an attempt to stop all activities there and to insist on the need to shut down climate-destructive mining operations. The blockade followed an action consensus that rejected property damage and sought to avoid direct confrontation with the police. Nonetheless, 280 of approximately 400 activists taking part were detained. The camera follows a group of activists awaiting deportation inside a police kettle, against the backdrop of a landscape defaced by lignite strip-mining. While the screen shows images filmed from inside a prisoner transport vehicle, we hear the voice of a semi-fictional character, reflecting on mass civil disobedience.

The work is part of Ressler’s ongoing project Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart that follows the struggles against a fossil fuel-dependent economy. The film was facilitated by Art for the Climate in the framework of the Czech Climate Camp in 2018, commissioned by S.a.L.E.-Docks, Venice for the exhibition Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart and received support from the Land Steiermark.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Limity Jsme My (2019)

4K video, 10'
Courtesy of the artist


This film leads us directly into the blockade of the Bílina coal mine in Northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. In June 2018, climate activists entered the mine in an attempt to stop all activities there and to insist on the need to shut down climate-destructive mining operations. The blockade followed an action consensus that rejected property damage and sought to avoid direct confrontation with the police. Nonetheless, 280 of approximately 400 activists taking part were detained. The camera follows a group of activists awaiting deportation inside a police kettle, against the backdrop of a landscape defaced by lignite strip-mining. While the screen shows images filmed from inside a prisoner transport vehicle, we hear the voice of a semi-fictional character, reflecting on mass civil disobedience.

The work is part of Ressler’s ongoing project Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart that follows the struggles against a fossil fuel-dependent economy. The film was facilitated by Art for the Climate in the framework of the Czech Climate Camp in 2018, commissioned by S.a.L.E.-Docks, Venice for the exhibition Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart and received support from the Land Steiermark.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Limity Jsme My (2019)

4K video, 10'
Courtesy of the artist


This film leads us directly into the blockade of the Bílina coal mine in Northern Bohemia in the Czech Republic. In June 2018, climate activists entered the mine in an attempt to stop all activities there and to insist on the need to shut down climate-destructive mining operations. The blockade followed an action consensus that rejected property damage and sought to avoid direct confrontation with the police. Nonetheless, 280 of approximately 400 activists taking part were detained. The camera follows a group of activists awaiting deportation inside a police kettle, against the backdrop of a landscape defaced by lignite strip-mining. While the screen shows images filmed from inside a prisoner transport vehicle, we hear the voice of a semi-fictional character, reflecting on mass civil disobedience.

The work is part of Ressler’s ongoing project Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart that follows the struggles against a fossil fuel-dependent economy. The film was facilitated by Art for the Climate in the framework of the Czech Climate Camp in 2018, commissioned by S.a.L.E.-Docks, Venice for the exhibition Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart and received support from the Land Steiermark.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Code Rood (2018)

4K video, 14'
Courtesy of the artist (2018)


The film highlights the civil disobedience action Code Rood in the port of Amsterdam in June 2017. The blockade of Europe’s second-largest coal port draws a red line against this important infrastructure facility for fossil capitalism. The largest single source of the coal shipments is Colombia, where coal is extracted under ecologically and socially devastating conditions.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Code Rood (2018)

4K video, 14'
Courtesy of the artist (2018)


The film highlights the civil disobedience action Code Rood in the port of Amsterdam in June 2017. The blockade of Europe’s second-largest coal port draws a red line against this important infrastructure facility for fossil capitalism. The largest single source of the coal shipments is Colombia, where coal is extracted under ecologically and socially devastating conditions.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Code Rood (2018)

4K video, 14'
Courtesy of the artist (2018)


The film highlights the civil disobedience action Code Rood in the port of Amsterdam in June 2017. The blockade of Europe’s second-largest coal port draws a red line against this important infrastructure facility for fossil capitalism. The largest single source of the coal shipments is Colombia, where coal is extracted under ecologically and socially devastating conditions.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: The ZAD (2017)

4K video, 36'
Courtesy of the artist


The film focuses on Europe’s largest autonomous territory, located close to Nantes in France. The ZAD (Zone À Défendre, zone to defend) emerged from the struggle against the construction of a new airport. In 2012 the French state’s attempt to evict the zone was fiercely resisted by more than 40,000 people, and the police have not set foot there ever since. Today, 250 people organized in 60 collectives live permanently at the ZAD occupying the wetlands, fields and forests. The ZAD is a successful example of the way resistance and the creation of alternatives need to happen at the same time. This film was commissioned by < rotor > center for contemporary art, Graz and the Maxim Gorki Theater, Berlin, and funded through additional support of ERSTE Foundation and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: The ZAD (2017)

4K video, 36'
Courtesy of the artist


The film focuses on Europe’s largest autonomous territory, located close to Nantes in France. The ZAD (Zone À Défendre, zone to defend) emerged from the struggle against the construction of a new airport. In 2012 the French state’s attempt to evict the zone was fiercely resisted by more than 40,000 people, and the police have not set foot there ever since. Today, 250 people organized in 60 collectives live permanently at the ZAD occupying the wetlands, fields and forests. The ZAD is a successful example of the way resistance and the creation of alternatives need to happen at the same time. This film was commissioned by < rotor > center for contemporary art, Graz and the Maxim Gorki Theater, Berlin, and funded through additional support of ERSTE Foundation and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: The ZAD (2017)

4K video, 36'
Courtesy of the artist


The film focuses on Europe’s largest autonomous territory, located close to Nantes in France. The ZAD (Zone À Défendre, zone to defend) emerged from the struggle against the construction of a new airport. In 2012 the French state’s attempt to evict the zone was fiercely resisted by more than 40,000 people, and the police have not set foot there ever since. Today, 250 people organized in 60 collectives live permanently at the ZAD occupying the wetlands, fields and forests. The ZAD is a successful example of the way resistance and the creation of alternatives need to happen at the same time. This film was commissioned by < rotor > center for contemporary art, Graz and the Maxim Gorki Theater, Berlin, and funded through additional support of ERSTE Foundation and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: The ZAD (2017)

4K video, 36'
Courtesy of the artist


The film focuses on Europe’s largest autonomous territory, located close to Nantes in France. The ZAD (Zone À Défendre, zone to defend) emerged from the struggle against the construction of a new airport. In 2012 the French state’s attempt to evict the zone was fiercely resisted by more than 40,000 people, and the police have not set foot there ever since. Today, 250 people organized in 60 collectives live permanently at the ZAD occupying the wetlands, fields and forests. The ZAD is a successful example of the way resistance and the creation of alternatives need to happen at the same time. This film was commissioned by < rotor > center for contemporary art, Graz and the Maxim Gorki Theater, Berlin, and funded through additional support of ERSTE Foundation and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Ende Gelände (2016)

4K video, 12'
Courtesy of the artist


The film on the Ende Gelände (end of the road) action shifts the focus to a massive civil disobedience action at the Lusatia lignite coal fields (near Berlin). 4,000 activists entered an open-cast mine, blocking the loading station and the rail connection to a coal-fired power plant. The blockades disrupted the coal supply and forced the Swedish proprietor Vattenfall to shut the power station down. The action was part of an international “global escalation” against the fossil fuel industry, calling on the world to “Break Free from Fossil Fuels” and putting that imperative directly into practice. The project was commissioned by MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest for Oliver Ressler’s solo exhibition “Property is Theft” and received support from the ERSTE Foundation, BKA Kunst and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Ende Gelände (2016)

4K video, 12'
Courtesy of the artist


The film on the Ende Gelände (end of the road) action shifts the focus to a massive civil disobedience action at the Lusatia lignite coal fields (near Berlin). 4,000 activists entered an open-cast mine, blocking the loading station and the rail connection to a coal-fired power plant. The blockades disrupted the coal supply and forced the Swedish proprietor Vattenfall to shut the power station down. The action was part of an international “global escalation” against the fossil fuel industry, calling on the world to “Break Free from Fossil Fuels” and putting that imperative directly into practice. The project was commissioned by MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest for Oliver Ressler’s solo exhibition “Property is Theft” and received support from the ERSTE Foundation, BKA Kunst and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: Ende Gelände (2016)

4K video, 12'
Courtesy of the artist


The film on the Ende Gelände (end of the road) action shifts the focus to a massive civil disobedience action at the Lusatia lignite coal fields (near Berlin). 4,000 activists entered an open-cast mine, blocking the loading station and the rail connection to a coal-fired power plant. The blockades disrupted the coal supply and forced the Swedish proprietor Vattenfall to shut the power station down. The action was part of an international “global escalation” against the fossil fuel industry, calling on the world to “Break Free from Fossil Fuels” and putting that imperative directly into practice. The project was commissioned by MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest for Oliver Ressler’s solo exhibition “Property is Theft” and received support from the ERSTE Foundation, BKA Kunst and Otto Mauer Fonds.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: COP21 (2016)

4K video, 17'
Courtesy of the artist


In the first film of the series Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart, activists contest the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris, a city then under a state of emergency. Like twenty failed annual climate conferences before it, COP21 in Paris in 2015 proved the incapacity of governments to commit themselves to any binding agreement that would curtail global warming through a definite strategy for the end of fossil fuel use. The resulting Climate Agreement avoids anything that would harm the economic interests of corporations. The governments now pretending that non-binding agreements can hold back climate change are the same ones whose binding free trade pacts make dead letter of local environmental and climate legislation.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: COP21 (2016)

4K video, 17'
Courtesy of the artist


In the first film of the series Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart, activists contest the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris, a city then under a state of emergency. Like twenty failed annual climate conferences before it, COP21 in Paris in 2015 proved the incapacity of governments to commit themselves to any binding agreement that would curtail global warming through a definite strategy for the end of fossil fuel use. The resulting Climate Agreement avoids anything that would harm the economic interests of corporations. The governments now pretending that non-binding agreements can hold back climate change are the same ones whose binding free trade pacts make dead letter of local environmental and climate legislation.

Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart: COP21 (2016)

4K video, 17'
Courtesy of the artist


In the first film of the series Everything's Coming Together While Everything's Falling Apart, activists contest the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris, a city then under a state of emergency. Like twenty failed annual climate conferences before it, COP21 in Paris in 2015 proved the incapacity of governments to commit themselves to any binding agreement that would curtail global warming through a definite strategy for the end of fossil fuel use. The resulting Climate Agreement avoids anything that would harm the economic interests of corporations. The governments now pretending that non-binding agreements can hold back climate change are the same ones whose binding free trade pacts make dead letter of local environmental and climate legislation.

Oliver Ressler

Oliver Ressler (b. 1970 in Knittelfeld, Austria) lives and works in Vienna. He creates  installations, projects in public space and films on issues such as economics, democracy, migration, global warming, forms of resistance and social alternatives. He has completed thirty-two films that have been screened in thousands of events of social movements, art institutions and film festivals. Solo exhibitions include: Berkeley Art Museum, USA; Alexandria Contemporary Arts Forum, Egypt; Wyspa Institute of Art, Gdansk; Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz; Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo CAAC, Seville; MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest; SALT Galata, Istanbul. Ressler has participated in more than 350 group exhibitions, including Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Biennials in Seville (2006), Moscow (2007), Taipei (2008), Lyon (2009), Venice (2013), Quebec (2014), Jeju (2017), Kyiv (2017) and at Documenta 14, Kassel, 2017 (exhibition organized by EMST). Ressler was the recipient of  the Prix Thun for Art and Ethics Award in 2016.

 

 

Oliver Ressler (b. 1970 in Knittelfeld, Austria) lives and works in Vienna. He creates  installations, projects in public space and films on issues such as economics, democracy, migration, global warming, forms of resistance and social alternatives. He has completed thirty-two films that have been screened in thousands of events of social movements, art institutions and film festivals. Solo exhibitions include: Berkeley Art Museum, USA; Alexandria Contemporary Arts Forum, Egypt; Wyspa Institute of Art, Gdansk; Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz; Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo CAAC, Seville; MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest; SALT Galata, Istanbul. Ressler has participated in more than 350 group exhibitions, including Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Biennials in Seville (2006), Moscow (2007), Taipei (2008), Lyon (2009), Venice (2013), Quebec (2014), Jeju (2017), Kyiv (2017) and at Documenta 14, Kassel, 2017 (exhibition organized by EMST). Ressler was the recipient of  the Prix Thun for Art and Ethics Award in 2016.

Oliver Ressler (b. 1970 in Knittelfeld, Austria) lives and works in Vienna. He creates  installations, projects in public space and films on issues such as economics, democracy, migration, global warming, forms of resistance and social alternatives. He has completed thirty-two films that have been screened in thousands of events of social movements, art institutions and film festivals. Solo exhibitions include: Berkeley Art Museum, USA; Alexandria Contemporary Arts Forum, Egypt; Wyspa Institute of Art, Gdansk; Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz; Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo CAAC, Seville; MNAC National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest; SALT Galata, Istanbul. Ressler has participated in more than 350 group exhibitions, including Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Biennials in Seville (2006), Moscow (2007), Taipei (2008), Lyon (2009), Venice (2013), Quebec (2014), Jeju (2017), Kyiv (2017) and at Documenta 14, Kassel, 2017 (exhibition organized by EMST). Ressler was the recipient of  the Prix Thun for Art and Ethics Award in 2016.

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